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Pa. poll watcher, a Navy vet, alleges missing USB cards, up to 120,000 questionable votes

Via: https://www.foxnews.com

A U.S. Navy veteran and data scientist from Pennsylvania alleged this week that 47 USB cards used during the state’s Nov. 3 election have gone missing – and asserted that as many as 120,000 votes cast in the election should be called into question.

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Man sues for refund of $2.5m he donated to Trump election challenge group

Via: https://www.independent.co.uk

Group offered man $1m not to sue them

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Joe Biden, Jill Biden's Heartfelt Thanksgiving Message Receives Warm Response From Netizens

Via: https://www.ibtimes.com

President-elect Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden delivered an endearing Thanksgiving message about the sacrifices made by the American people amid the pandemic. The message was met with a warm response from the netizens.

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Drinking hot cocoa is linked to better memory skills because it's filled with brain-healthy nutrients, a study found

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

In a small new study, men who drank hot cocoa did better on memory tests. Researchers credit nutrients called flavanols, also found in tea.

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Utah monolith: Internet sleuths got there, but its origins are still a mystery

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

The metal monolith sits deep in a desert easy to get lost in, so officials did not reveal its location.

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Trump Flips Out At Reporter: 'Don't Ever Talk To The President That Way'

Via: https://www.huffpost.com

Reuters White House correspondent Jeff Mason pushed back on Trump's election fraud claims, prompting an outburst.

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Angry Trump promises rally in the battleground state of Georgia

Via: https://www.latimes.com

President Trump on Thursday renewed baseless claims that “massive fraud” and crooked local officials in battleground states led to his election defeat.

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Donald J. Trump on Twitter

Via: https://twitter.com

“Twitter is sending out totally false “Trends” that have absolutely nothing to do with what is really trending in the world. They make it up, and only negative “stuff”. Same thing will happen to Twitter as is happening to @FoxNews daytime. Also, big Conservative discrimination!”

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Robert Reich Says It's 'Trump's Fault You Can't See Your Family'

Via: https://www.breitbart.com

Reich claimed, without evidence, that the U.S. would have had coronavirus under control if not for Republican leaders. | Economy

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AstraZeneca will likely retest its COVID-19 vaccine, CEO says after admitting an error in the first trial that may have skewed results

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

AstraZeneca said Monday that its vaccine was found to be up to 90% effective at preventing COVID-19. But an error in that trial may warrant a new one.

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Biden predicted a GOP 'epiphany' after the election. Trump's standing in the way.

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

Some Democrats worry the president-elect's talk of bipartisanship sets him up for failure.

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In Thanksgiving Message, Trump Says ‘We’re Like a Third-World Country’ Because He Lost Election

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

In a surprise news conference on Thanksgiving Day, President Trump took questions from the press for the first time since losing re-election—but he doubled down on his “rigged” election claims and appeared to deny the reality that his presidency is ending, saying it will be “very hard” for him to concede to Joe Biden.“I think it’s not right he’s trying to pick a Cabinet,” Trump complained after railing against the supposed “massive fraud” that he claims gave Biden victory.Reiterating his claims of voter fraud in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Georgia despite the fact that state authorities have already certified the election results in those states, Trump appeared to become combative when asked if he would concede if the Electoral College votes for Biden on Dec. 14: “It’s going to be a very hard thing to concede. Because we know there was massive fraud.”“Time isn’t on our side … this was a massive fraud, this should never take place in this country, we’re like a third-world country,” he said, suggesting that faulty vote-counting machines gave Biden millions of extra votes.Asked a second time if he would concede if the Electoral College votes for Biden, Trump responded, “Well if they do they made a mistake,” before saying it’s a “possibility” and scolding a reporter who pressed him on the issue: “Don’t talk to me that way, you’re just a lightweight.”Asked by another reporter if he would “leave this building” if the Electoral College elects Biden, he said, “Certainly, I will.”While Trump and his legal team have repeatedly looked to throw out votes in states that Joe Biden carried, none of their challenges have proved successful.Key states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Georgia—all of which Trump carried in 2016, before flipping blue this year—certified their results this week, ensuring they will send a Democratic slate of voters to the Electoral College. Wisconsin and Arizona, two more states that flipped to Biden, are set to certify their results next week.“Massive fraud has been found. We’re like a third world country,” Trump said, before launching back into allegations of voter fraud that have been repeatedly rebuffed in court and by state election officials of both parties.“I did so well ... that they didn’t know what to do,” he said at one point of election results in Georgia, claiming that ballots for him were “thrown away.”“I don’t know what is going to happen. I know one thing, Joe Biden did not get 80 million votes. And I got 74 million but there were many ballots thrown away, so I got much more than that. But I got 74 million, 74 million is 11 million more than I got last time. … And it’s millions more than Hillary Clinton got.”Underneath all of the bravado, Trump at one point slipped up and blasted “the Biden administration,” apparently inadvertently recognizing Biden’s win.While Trump has refused to concede and maintained that somehow, he would win states he had already lost, his administration has relented behind the scenes.Earlier this week, Emily Murphy, the head of the General Services Administrations—a Trump appointee—signed off on a letter officially allowing the presidential transition to begin. Murphy had previously refused to do so, a partisan move from a historically non-partisan agency.Even Trump appeared to have a moment of clarity Thursday regarding a potential COVID-19 cure and his future (or lack thereof) in the White House.“Don’t let Joe Biden take credit for the vaccine,” he said.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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NRA admits some executives used nonprofit money for personal benefit

Via: https://thehill.com

The National Rifle Association (NRA) admitted in a tax filing that some of the group’s current and former executives have used the nonprofit’s money for personal benefit. 

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Trump flips out on reporter: 'I'm the President of the United States!'

Via: https://www.youtube.com

President Trump condemned a reporter after being asked if he would concede the election if the Electoral College votes for Joe Biden. #CNN #News

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Donald J. Trump on Twitter

Via: https://twitter.com

“I gave a long news conference today after wishing the military a Happy Thanksgiving, & realized once again that the Fake News Media coordinates so that the real message of such a conference never gets out. Primary point made was that the 2020 Election was RIGGED, and that I WON!”

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What is Putin’s Endgame With Americans Detained in Russia?

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

One of the first challenges Joe Biden will face as president is how to deal with Vladimir Putin, leader of the country that Biden has labelled the biggest threat to the United States. In contrast to the impetuous and inconsistent Donald Trump, Putin is generally seen as a resolute leader, who unflaggingly pursues his country's foreign policy goals, however malign. But the cases of three Americans who are currently detained in Russia belie this image of Putin, portraying instead a leader who is dysfunctionally beholden to the interests of his security services and the corrupt clans who form his power base.The case of American investor Michael Calvey, which should be decided by a Moscow court within the next few weeks, offers a particularly striking example of how Putin has allowed a corrupted legal and financial system to undermine Russia’s broader interests. Calvey, arrested along with five others in February 2019 on bogus fraud charges, founded the highly successful private equity firm Baring Vostok, which since 1994 has brought over $3.7 billion of capital into Russia. A fluent Russian-speaker with a Russian wife, Calvey always played by the rules, never criticizing Putin, and was highly respected in the Russian business community. As Leonid Bershidsky of Bloomberg News noted after the arrests: “Calvey became a legend in the Russian market, in part because of his reputed aversion to any kind of foul play and focus on industries and companies unlikely to attract the attention of Russia’s authorities.” Russian billionaire Leonid Boguslavsky said in an interview last week that Calvey had been his inspiration and teacher when he, Boguslavsky, was advancing his investment career in the 1990s.Americans Paul Whelan and Michael Calvey Are Not the Only ‘Hostages’ Held By The KremlinCalvey’s downfall came as a result of a 2017 merger between Vostochny Bank, in which Baring Vostok had a majority stake, and a bank called Uniastrum, owned by an avaricious 44-year-old businessman named Artem Avetisyan, who is a Putin favorite. When Avetisyan and his partners attempted to exercise an option on 9.9 percent of Vostochny Bank’s shares in 2018, Baring Vostok refused, because of evidence that assets worth billions of rubles had been withdrawn from Uniastrum Bank before the merger. Baring Vostok then filed claims of fraud against Avetisyan for 17.5 billion rubles (around $276 million) in the London International Arbitration Court.In apparent retaliation for the London lawsuit, Avetisyan’s partner Sherzod Yusupov went to the FSB in February 2019 with a claim that Calvey and five associates from Baring Vostok had defrauded Vostochny Bank of 2.5 billion rubles ($38 million at the time). According to the claim, Calvey and his colleagues had repaid a bank loan for that amount with shares from a Luxembourg company called IFTG that were worth only 600,000 rubles. In fact the transaction was approved by all the bank’s shareholders, including Avetisyan and Yusupov, and a September 2019 re-evaluation of the IFTG shares established their worth, with restrictions on them lifted, at more than 3 billion rubles. Significantly, officials from the Economic Security Department of the MVD (regular police) had earlier conducted an audit of the bank transactions that later formed the basis for the criminal case, but found no illegalities.After his arrest, which sent shockwaves throughout the Russian investment community, Calvey spent several weeks in Moscow’s notorious Matrosskaya Tishina Prison (where Sergei Magnitsky died) before being transferred to house arrest in April 2019. Two months later, a Russian arbitration court in the Far Eastern region of Amur forced Baring Vostok to sell 10 percent of Vostochny Bank stock to Finvision, a holding company owned by Avetisyan, thus awarding him and his partner Yusupov control of the bank, which has continued to show significant losses.Calvey and his partners had come up against a powerful lobby. Avetisyan, a skilled self-promoter, heads the New Business Division of the Agency for Strategic Initiatives, a Kremlin-sponsored project that puts him in regular contact with Putin, who chairs the agency’s advisory board, where Avetisyan serves. Also on the board is Putin's top economic advisor, Andrei Belousov, who in June 2020 was appointed first deputy prime minister of Russia. Although he and Avetisyan are known to have a close friendship, Belousov denied reports that he was Avetisyan’s go-between with Putin on the Calvey affair: “I have known Artem Avetisyan for a long time. He is my friend, we go to the mountains together…But over my long years of service, I have learned to separate personal and official relationships.”Also useful for Avetisyan is his close acquaintance with Dmitry Patrushev, son of former FSB chief Nikolai Patrushev, head of Putin’s National Security Council. Avetisyan served with Dmitry on the board of the Russian Agricultural Bank, which Dmitry ran prior to becoming Russian Minister of Agriculture in 2018. In addition to membership on the boards of several Russian companies, Avetisyan is a member of the FSB’s Public Advisory Council, an exclusive body that presumably gives him direct access to FSB officials.As if Avetisyan’s personal and business ties were not enough to promote his vendetta against Calvey and Baring Vostok, in June of this year, the media company bne Intellinews claimed to have obtained a tranche of letters that Avetisyan had sent to Putin, the FSB and the Russian Central Bank, in which he falsely accused Baring Vostok of a series of illegalities, including bribing a former chief of the Russian security services, Vadim Bakatin, a born-again Russian democrat who once served as adviser to the firm. Avetisyan did not respond to requests for comments about the letters.On Oct. 28, just after Deputy Prosecutor-General Viktor Grin approved the indictment against Calvey and his associates, Vostochny Bank and the defendants reached a settlement of their civil dispute. In exchange for a payment of 2.5 billion rubles by Baring Vostok, the bank agreed to drop the civil charges that give rise to the original criminal case. Presumably as a result of this settlement, the Supreme Court on Nov. 12, the date that the arrest orders expired, ordered the release (with some restrictions) of Calvey and the others from house arrest.Despite the hopes expressed by lawyers for Calvey, Russian legal experts doubt that the Calvey case, which is due to be heard sometime before Jan. 12, 2020, will end in an acquittal. “[Exonerating Mr. Calvey] would mean explaining to Putin the case was a mistake and nobody wants to do that,” a source who was involved in the legal negotiations said earlier this fall.According to one prominent lawyer, “in Russia, procedurally agreeing to compensate for damage does not mean that the defendant has admitted guilt. But in practice, courts and investigators often perceive it this way.” More likely is that the judge will consider the paid compensation as a mitigating factor and impose a more lenient sentence (the maximum being 10 years) so that with the time served, the defendants will be released.Barron’s recently quoted a top Russia financial analyst on the Calvey case: “This has been one of the most damaging events in Russia's economic history and has directly led to foreign investment decisions in Russia being cancelled or suspended.” Many members of the Russian business elite, including Kirill Dmitriev, head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, Yandex CEO Arkady Volozh and Anatoly Chubais, head of a state technology fund, have spoken out strongly in Calvey’s defense. Billionaire Boguslavsky called the prosecution of Calvey and his partners “a case of blatant injustice and cruelty” that should be stopped immediately.In fact, what happened to Calvey happens to Russian businessmen on a regular basis. Just in October, Mikhail Khabarov, first deputy chairman of Trust Bank, was arrested for large-scale fraud following a complaint by a former partner. The phenomenon of “raiding” (reiderstvo)—whereby entrepreneurs are criminally charged and forced to relinquish their assets to other businessmen, with law-enforcement officers getting a cut—has become so widespread that Putin has even complained about it publicly. But he has done nothing to stop it.In contrast to Calvey, former U.S. Marines Paul Whelan and Trevor Reed face the possibility of years behind bars in Russia. Whelan, who was arrested by the FSB in his Moscow hotel room on espionage charges in December 2018, is an unlikely CIA spy. Not only was he dishonorably discharged from the Marines in 2008 for theft, he had for years openly pursued a close friendship with a Russian, Ilya Yatsenko, who worked for the FSB. (Last week, in his first interview since his arrest, Whelan insisted that his friend Yatsenko worked for the border guard, not the FSB. Whelan was apparently unaware that the Russian border guard has been an integral part of the FSB since 2003.) After accepting a thumb drive from Yatsenko that allegedly contained FSB secrets—Whelan thought it was holiday photographs—he was tried and sentenced to 16 years in a strict regime penal colony located 300 miles east of Moscow, in Mordovia, home of the former Stalinist gulag.Reed, 29, was arrested during a May 2019 visit to Moscow to see his Russian girlfriend. After Reed got uncontrollably drunk at a party, his friends called the police because they were worried about his safety. He was later accused, with no proof, of assaulting two police officers on the way to station. (It is unclear whether the police had handcuffed Reed or had a video camera in their car.) In July of this year, Reed was sentenced to nine years imprisonment—an extremely harsh sentence by any standards. The Moscow City Court is currently considering an appeal against the sentence that Reed filed in late October. Russia’s aim in what appears to be blatant hostage-taking of these two Americans is apparently to get the U.S. to agree to a prisoner exchange for two Russians in U.S. prisons—the notorious arms trader Viktor Bout, currently serving a 25-year sentence for terrorism, and Konstantin Yaroshenko, who was sentenced in 2010 to 20 years behind bars for drug smuggling.In his recent interview with ABC from his prison camp, Whelan expressed optimism that he would soon be released as part of a swap, which his captors have suggested might happen. (This may be one reason why prison authorities allowed Whelan this unprecedented interview.) But although Trump has reportedly urged Putin to release Whelan and Reed, along with Calvey, there has been no progress. Whelan’s Russian attorney, Vladimir Zherebenkov, said in October that no decisions would be made until after the U.S. elections, so clearly the Kremlin will be recalculating its position now that Biden has been elected president.Putin has pretended to remain above the fray. In a March 2020 interview with TASS, he said of the Calvey case: “We need to proceed from our country’s legislation and the supremacy of Russian law… I cannot say if he is guilty or not until there is a well-founded [court decision].” But Putin is doubtless consulted before any key decisions are made. According to a top Putin aide, Calvey’s French partner, Philippe Delpal, was transferred from prison to house arrest in August 2019 because of upcoming talks between Putin and French President Emmanuel Macron. And the release of Calvey and the other defendants from house arrests just days after U.S. presidential elections suggest that Putin might have been extending an olive branch to Biden.Russian Media Is Angry and Desperate Over Biden WinA source familiar with the Calvey case told me that “having Trump tweet or ask Putin for a favor would not be helpful.” But Biden, who has criticized Trump for not speaking out about the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, has a more clear-eyed view of Putin. With Antony Blinken, a known advocate of a tough stance against Russia, as his secretary of state, Biden will be in a strong position to negotiate successfully with the Kremlin over the detained Americans. (Russia’s Kommersant reported Tuesday that foreign policy experts in Moscow have been sending each other the link to Blinken’s 2017 interview with PBS, in which he accused Putin of establishing a kleptocracy.)As former U.S. ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul said last April, it would set a dangerous precedent if Washington would agree to exchange either Bout or Yaroshenko for Whelan or Reed: “There’s a real asymmetry swapping an innocent American for a real convicted criminal who just happens to have Russian citizenship.” And such an exchange might encourage the FSB to engage in further entrapments of innocent foreigners in Russia.But the Biden administration would have other strategies available to address the three cases, including threatening the Kremlin with harsher economic sanctions. Although sanctions against Russia are often criticized for being ineffective, they have been a powerful tool when used in coordination with European allies. Also, in addition to Russian officials who are directly responsible for the Kremlin’s misdeeds, sanctions could target, with travel bans and asset freezing, more of those wealthy Russian businessmen who gain financially from Putin's corrupt system. Calvey’s enemy Avetisyan might be first on the list. In a 2011 interview, Avetisyan said he could not imagine living abroad because he had a strong “Russian mentality.” But that has not stopped him from acquiring over 20 million Euros worth of luxury properties in Tuscany, along with an Italian residence permit.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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Zoom nightmare come true: New Jersey school board member resigns after streaming bathroom break during meeting

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

Stop taking Zoom into the bathroom. A New Jersey school board member accidentally broadcast her bathroom break during a board meeting and resigned.

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Las Vegas mayor calls Nevada governor 'a dictator' over stricter coronavirus order

Via: https://www.foxnews.com

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman called Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak “a dictator” after the Democratic governor issued a three-week “state-wide pause” to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. 

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Families Have Been Torn Apart by Politics. What Happens to Them Now?

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

Tho Nguyen's parents, who immigrated from Vietnam, were always Republican. They are Catholic and oppose abortion. Four years ago they voted for Donald Trump.But nothing prepared Nguyen, 25, a medical student in Kansas, for how much politics would divide her family over the next four years, as her parents became increasingly passionate about the president.In recent weeks, as the election drew nearer, Nguyen said she has had screaming fights with her parents -- very unusual for her family. Her mother threatened to stop cooking if she and her sisters voted for Joe Biden. She had to look up the word "brainwashed" in Vietnamese. But when she used it to describe her parents, her father said it applied to her.Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York TimesShe said her parents did not believe Biden could have won, and it was hard to convince them otherwise, because that is not what they were hearing from Vietnamese sources on Facebook."In my dad's mind, more than half of the votes for Biden were illegal," said Nguyen, who lives with her parents and was spending Thanksgiving with them. "It's just wild."The shock of Donald Trump's election in 2016, just before the holiday season, tested many American families who had to confront -- or avoid altogether -- political disagreements over Thanksgiving dinners. Many Democrats said they were angry at family members who voted for him. Republicans rejected the notion that their votes were referendums on whether they were good people.But four years later, for some families, those differences have mutated into something deeper -- a divide over basic facts and visions for America's future. That rift feels even harder to mend after the 2020 election, as Trump stoked conspiracy theories questioning the legitimacy of Biden's win.In interviews during and after the election, Americans talked about the differences that had emerged in their families over politics and how they had changed over the past four years. Some had learned to live with them, and were trying hard to focus on the things they had in common. Others had not spoken since 2016.Many were in a stressful, messy place in between -- trying to manage with loved ones who saw the world differently than they did. Several asked that their last names not be published because they did not want to lose the diminished relationships they still had. In most cases relatives with whom there was conflict -- and who may have offered different accounts of the disagreements -- were not contacted.Unlike 2016, when conflicts emerged over political choices, this time they centered on the result itself, even though officials have not seen any evidence of fraud. Polls since the election have found that large majorities of those who voted for Trump do not believe the election was fair. Large shares also say mail-in ballots were manipulated in favor of Biden. But the situation is fluid, and interviews with voters showed substantial variation among Republicans, many of whom have their own stories of family loss."I believe it was all on the up and up," said William Hill, a lawyer in the Midwest, of the election. Hill voted for Trump, but said he believed that Biden "is not a bad guy. He's not going to do something that's going to harm the country. He's just not."But the election result has not mended the rupture in his family. He said his sister, who lives in Seattle, blew up at him after he voted for Trump in 2016, and they haven't spoken since. He said he has sent her and her wife a Christmas gift every year -- a box of nuts from a local gourmet shop -- but he has never heard back. The most recent news of her, he said, was a post on Facebook after the election agreeing with someone who said, "Why would we want to unify with those people?""It hurts," said Hill, who is 50. He said his sister and her wife "are good people," and it still baffles him that political differences could cost a relationship. "My daughter sees things completely differently than I do politically, but she still gives me a hug every night."The political divisions within families, while widespread, are far from universal. Dr. Joshua Coleman, a psychologist who specializes in estrangement, said that while he now has such cases in his practice, they are still a small share of the business, and, so far, mostly consist of millennials or other younger Americans pulling back from or cutting off their more conservative baby boomer parents.That was the case in the Ackley family.Danielle Ackley of North Carolina and her mother have always been different politically. But they agreed to disagree, even after Trump's 2016 win, which Ackley said brought her son to tears.But during a visit last month, they got into a terrible argument over politics. Ackley, 37, said she got angry when she heard her mother criticize Biden's character. Then it escalated. It ended with her telling her mother to leave."This is not even a political divide, it's a reality divide," said Ackley, who added that she felt even more distant after seeing her mother comment approvingly on a Facebook post questioning mail-in ballots.For Debbie Ackley, who is 59, the experience was painful and a shock. She said she remembers staring down at her phone, trying not to cry. She left the next morning, hours earlier than she had planned, and was so upset on the drive that she worried she might crash.She said she loved her daughter, and though she did not understand her anger, she knew it came from a good place."Danielle has got the biggest heart," she said. "She's very sensitive and very loving. She takes things to heart."She said she was frustrated by what she saw as a growing intolerance in the country."It's scary that there's very little tolerance and respect for other people's views and opinions -- that's what makes me sad," she said.As for the election, she said she has no doubt that there was fraud in the mail-in ballots, but whether it was enough to change the outcome, "I really don't know."In the most extreme cases, what began as a manageable political disagreement in 2016 morphed into something much darker, as people watched family members who voted for Trump become absorbed by conspiracy theories that the president himself was spreading.Christine, a real estate agent in Massachusetts, remembers her mother's excitement at Trump's win in 2016. They were on a family vacation, and no one else was happy about it, but the difference didn't seem to matter very much.But over the past year, she said she has seen her mother, a 75-year-old waitress, change from an enthusiastic gardener and antiques shopper to someone so obsessed with the QAnon conspiracy theory that she said she could no longer get through to her. Her mother was spending her free time staring at her iPad, and this spring, bought a necklace with a Q on it."I feel like I've been in mourning for someone who is still alive, and that's a bizarre thing," said Christine, 34, who shares a last name with her mother and asked that it not be used in order to protect their privacy. "The person she used to be is not here anymore. I miss her so much."She said this was the first Thanksgiving of her life that she would not be spending with her mother, who had been one of her closest confidants and lives 10 miles away.For many, the key to preventing estrangement is not talking about politics in the first place. That is how Michelle, a health care worker in Arizona, has tried to manage the situation in her family. She said her sister voted for Trump, but they agreed long ago never to discuss it, and are best friends who talk every day."We're both like, nope, we're not going to do it," she said. "I value her as my sister, we are really close."But she cried as she described having to block her father, a retired manager for a manufacturing firm, from her email this fall, because of what she said was a constant stream of conspiracy-laden messages that he would not stop sending even after she had asked. She asked that her last name not be used because she feared further damage to her relationship with him."I'm just sad," she said, crying softly. "Just because, you know, he's my dad, and he's always helped me if I've ever needed it. He's always been there for me."Still, she planned to see him on Thanksgiving, outside and masked.A number of older voters said they grew up around family and friends who didn't always agree with them politically, but those distinctions mattered less to a person's identity then. They didn't pick fights over them, because politics was not who you were."I really just don't see alienating my family over this," said Joe Wallace, 75, a retired pipe fitter in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania who voted for Biden. He said that he was baffled by his sisters' strong support for Trump, but that he never talked about it with them. "It's not worth it."Will relationships heal now that Trump is no longer president? Nearly everyone interviewed for this article who had experienced a falling out said they did not think so -- at least not immediately. Estelle Moore, a retired flight attendant in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, said it was as if we had seen things in each other that we weren't supposed to. But now that we had, we could not un-see them."It's like frying chicken," said Moore, 64, sitting in a lawn chair outside her small brick house. "Once you put it into that hot grease, it becomes something different."The Ackleys aren't giving up. A week after the election, Danielle Ackley sent her mother a message. She had spent days composing it, sitting on her lunch break at the plant nursery where she works. Her mother wrote back that they had many things to talk about. Politics did not have to one of them.Debbie Ackley said it reminded her of the time she took her young son to the circus and encountered her daughter, then a high schooler, protesting the treatment of the elephants."That's my daughter," she said. "I'm so proud of her. I'm so proud of the person she has become."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

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Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon tests positive for COVID-19

Via: https://www.foxnews.com

Gordon is the latest governor to test positive for the disease this year, following similar announcements from Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt, and Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine.

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An American tourist who stole and inscribed a note on a shard of ancient Roman marble mailed it back to Italy, apologizing for being an 'a--hole'

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

The National Roman Museum said it received the piece — daubed with "To Sam, love Jess, Rome 2017" — in a parcel sent from Atlanta, Georgia.

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Disney Cuts 28,000 Staff as Coronavirus Devastates Theme Park Business

Via: https://www.breitbart.com

Walt Disney Co said 32,000 theme park workers will be laid off starting in the New Year, a jump from the 28,000 it announced in September.

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Man sues for refund of $2.5m he donated to Trump election challenge group

Via: https://news.yahoo.com

Group offered man $1m not to sue them

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Trump plans trip to Georgia amid his election battle

Via: https://www.foxnews.com

President Trump said he would travel to Georgia on Saturday to campaign for Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue ahead of their runoff elections.

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Donald J. Trump on Twitter

Via: https://twitter.com

“For purposes of National Security, Section 230 must be immediately terminated!!!”

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DEE SPORTS GUY on Twitter

Via: https://twitter.com

“QB's Deshaun Watson (Houston Texans) & Matthew Stafford (Detroit Lions) exercising Social Justice support during the National Anthem minutes ago”

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CDC data: Abortion rates rise slightly

Via: https://thehill.com

The abortion rate in the U.S. ticked up slightly from 2017 to 2018, according to data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by 47 states and New York City. 

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Donor In Trump's Election 'Fraud' Fight Sues To Snatch Back His $2.5 Million Contribution

Via: https://www.huffpost.com

Venture capitalist Fred Eshelman blasts group that launched failed court cases that couldn't come up with any evidence of rigged voting.

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Democrats Want Unity Only on Their Terms

Via: https://pjmedia.com

Many Trump haters have been lying all along about President Donald Trump, what he stands for, what his record has been and who his supporters are. Now they tell us they want unity....

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Hayward: Coronavirus Helps China’s Totalitarian Social Credit System Spread Worldwide

Via: https://www.breitbart.com

Chinese President Xi Jinping suggests the entire world should adopt a coronavirus health tracking app similar to China's intrusive system.

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